care practices

Blurring Boundaries: Rethinking Gender and Care

The interdisciplinary Bavarian Research Association ForGenderCare invites authors to submit abstracts for the conference.

Call for Abstracts by August 31

New employment patterns, pluralized family forms, changing gender roles, altered conceptions of maternity and paternity, changed family care networks and the professionalization of hitherto rather privately organized care practices make it necessary to rethink care and its social organization.

For more information get the Pdf-Download: CfP: Blurring Boundaries: Rethinking Gender and Care

See also the Conference website

 

Why Care? Symposium Berlin

Call for papers. Abstracts by March 30

Why care? is an attempt to critically explore the massive mobilization of care in modern life. It interrogates the biopolitical ambivalences of the modern institutionalization of care as well as the prevailing economies and economics of care regarding what counts as care, the value of care, and its differential allocation.

The moral relevance of lived experience

As care ethics tries to value the particular bodily experience of patients and caregivers it is by no means very clear how to do so. Recently a book was published by Steven C. van den Heuvel et al., Theological ethics and moral value Phenomena (Routledge, 2018). You are welcome to read a sample: On the basis of an observation of a care scene in the complexity of a general hospital, Frans Vosman proposes to use political phenomenology to address those experiences. He criticizes bioethics for its abstraction of experience. As an alternative, he suggests discovering Gestalt-like figures in care scenes. Continue reading The moral relevance of lived experience

Summercourse Ethics in Dementia Care

The number of persons with dementia will rise considerably in the years to come. The increasing prevalence of dementia and the treatment and care for people with dementia present a myriad of important ethical questions and responsibilities. What do we think of the quality of life of people with dementia and of their subsequent end of life? What are the opinions about vulnerability and dignity in case of dementia? What do we consider to be ‘good care’ and ‘a good death’ for persons with dementia? Continue reading Summercourse Ethics in Dementia Care