relationality

Blurring Boundaries: Rethinking Gender and Care Augsburg Germany

The interdisciplinary Bavarian Research Association ForGenderCare invites authors to submit abstracts for the conference.

Call for Abstracts by August 31

New employment patterns, pluralized family forms, changing gender roles, altered conceptions of maternity and paternity, changed family care networks and the professionalization of hitherto rather privately organized care practices make it necessary to rethink care and its social organization.

For more information get the Pdf-Download: CfP: Blurring Boundaries: Rethinking Gender and Care

See also the Conference website

 

The permanence of non-sovereignty in our relations with others

‘Why care’ was the title of a symposium organised by ICI Berlin Institute for Cultural Inquiry (July 2018) and Lisa Baraitser, author of Enduring time (published November 2017), was one of the academics who presented her thinking. Lisa Baraitser is professor of Psychosocial Theory in the Department of Psychosocial Studies at Birkbeck, University of London Continue reading The permanence of non-sovereignty in our relations with others

Care as essential human condition

20th H e n r i  N o u w e n  L ecture
STEPHAN POSNER

Stephan Posner resists the ongoing downgrading of care as a ‘product’, a burden or a debit entry. Instead of this view giving and receiving care can be seen as an essential human condition.

Reservations by email below or written to:

Avenue Concordia 117, 3062 LG Rotterdam, The Netherlands

See also the (Dutch) Flyer

 

Questioning the Dutch political discourse regarding ‘completed life’

Should the state facilitate assisted suicide when someone develops a death wish on account of the prospect of needing a wheelchair? And what should the response be when, if it involves a couple, one of the two partners has this prospect and will likely need to move to a nursing home, so that the couple can no longer live together as before? Should there be a state-regulated organization to fulfil their shared wish to die? Continue reading Questioning the Dutch political discourse regarding ‘completed life’

Physical touch in caring

One morning, as I enter the closed ward for people with dementia, I come across an intensely frightened and distressed Clara. Sobbing and searching she wanders down the corridor. Almost instinctively, I take her in my arms, and she calms down.

During my studies to become a spiritual counsellor, emphasis was placed on learning conversation skills. Little attention was paid to the bodily aspects of this work, whereas, in my opinion, physical proximity in the care relationship is very important. Continue reading Physical touch in caring