Category Archives: Academic Exchange

Physical touch in caring

One morning, as I enter the closed ward for people with dementia, I come across an intensely frightened and distressed Clara. Sobbing and searching she wanders down the corridor. Almost instinctively, I take her in my arms, and she calms down.

During my studies to become a spiritual counsellor, emphasis was placed on learning conversation skills. Little attention was paid to the bodily aspects of this work, whereas, in my opinion, physical proximity in the care relationship is very important. Continue reading Physical touch in caring

The permanence of non-sovereignty in our relations with others

‘Why care’ was the title of a symposium organised by ICI Berlin Institute for Cultural Inquiry (July 2018) and Lisa Baraitser, author of Enduring time (published November 2017), was one of the academics who presented her thinking. Lisa Baraitser is professor of Psychosocial Theory in the Department of Psychosocial Studies at Birkbeck, University of London Continue reading The permanence of non-sovereignty in our relations with others

Political Repair in relation to Tronto’s political ethics of care

Political ethics, even strands professing to an expressive-collaborative model of morality, still assume that there is a common moral community with a set of shared default understandings, which are divested of public deliberation. Authors of the political difference between the political and apolitical politics propose a shift which puts the political struggle over whether there is a common community with common understandings center stage. Continue reading Political Repair in relation to Tronto’s political ethics of care

The relevance of critical insights of postcolonial theory

Care theory started out as a critical epistemology that added a different, a female voice to morality. As a political ethics, care theory has moreover turned its attention to political practices and institutions that beget inequality and power asymmetries through political practices of gendering and racializing, and thereby devaluing and marginalizing, care work and carers. Continue reading The relevance of critical insights of postcolonial theory