Category Archives: Reviews

Reviews of books, films, expositions that are internationally accessible. We think (non-academic) books, films and exhibitions can tell us something about how society at large, authors or artists look at care ethical issues such as vulnerability, how relationships generate responsibilities and how political decisions influence the life of all of us as caregivers and carereceivers. Their view may help us to further develop our own views and understand our own sentiments.

‘A place gets a face’ – Agnes Varda’s attentive compassion with the social

The French movie Faces, Places (‘Visages, villages’ – 2017) by Agnes Varda, well known for her films co-setting the trend for the Nouvelle Vague, and by JR, a young and enigmatic photographer and street artist, is a many layered documentary that makes you wake up with a smile in the morning. Continue reading ‘A place gets a face’ – Agnes Varda’s attentive compassion with the social

Cure Park – Art practice as a model for reflection

Cure Park was an art manifestation that was held from 4 June to 16 July 2017 in the ‘Amsterdamse Bos’, or Amsterdam Forest. The theme ‘care’ – in the broadest sense of the word – was both highlighted and questioned. During this event, more than 30 artists, creators and thinkers joinend the public and healthcare professionals. The program consisted of an art route, experiments, interventions, workshops, lectures, performances and films. Webeditor Tessa Smorenburg interviewed curator Theo Tegelaers from TAAK and spoke to him about the potential and urgency of the art practice as a reflective model for the public domain. Continue reading Cure Park – Art practice as a model for reflection

Moonlight – Who decides who you are?

‘You decide who you are’, Juan tells the young Chiron in one scene. But I wonder, what will appear if I look closer? The film Moonlight (Barry Jenkins, 2016) won three Oscars – including the one for Best Film, a first for a film with a cast consisting entirely of people of color. On top of that fact, the film also deals with overt Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) themes, a controversial subject in conservative and predominantly white Hollywood. Moonlight tells the story of a young, homosexual Afro-American man who grows up in a poor neighbourhood of Miami, USA. Moreover it shows the complexity of finding one’s position in a masculine environment while having to hide your nature from the light of day. Continue reading Moonlight – Who decides who you are?

Critical Ethics of Care in Social Work

This book, a collection of articles on critical ethics of care and social work, is worthwhile reading for all who wish a better understanding of social work and its political importance. This political importance is unveiled by investigating social work practices from a ethics of care perspective, thus also showing the political nature of a critical ethics of care. Continue reading Critical Ethics of Care in Social Work

Strangers in their own land

Laurine Blonk & Ellen Grootegoed reviewed Hochschild’s book “Strangers in their own land”.
Nominated for the American ‘National Book Award for non-fiction’ after its publication in 2016, sociologist Arlie Hochschild’s latest book Strangers in their own lands. Anger and mourning on the American right is a must-read for everyone who feels estranged after the recent victories of right-wing politics.  Continue reading Strangers in their own land