Category Archives: Reviews

Reviews of books, films, expositions that are internationally accessible. We think (non-academic) books, films and exhibitions can tell us something about how society at large, authors or artists look at care ethical issues such as vulnerability, how relationships generate responsibilities and how political decisions influence the life of all of us as caregivers and carereceivers. Their view may help us to further develop our own views and understand our own sentiments.

‘A place gets a face’ – Agnes Varda’s attentive compassion with the social

The French movie Faces, Places (‘Visages, villages’ – 2017) by Agnes Varda, well known for her films co-setting the trend for the Nouvelle Vague, and by JR, a young and enigmatic photographer and street artist, is a many layered documentary that makes you wake up with a smile in the morning. Continue reading ‘A place gets a face’ – Agnes Varda’s attentive compassion with the social

A 21st-Century Burning Issue: Doughnut Economics

Over time, perception has shifted of what economics ought to represent and how it should be applied. In Kate Raworth’s Doughnut Economics, a new paradigm is presented, meant to replace the prevailing neoclassical one. An introduction to this worldwide influential book and its background: could it be of interest to care ethics? Continue reading A 21st-Century Burning Issue: Doughnut Economics

Critical Ethics of Care in Social Work

This book, a collection of articles on critical ethics of care and social work, is worthwhile reading for all who wish a better understanding of social work and its political importance. This political importance is unveiled by investigating social work practices from a ethics of care perspective, thus also showing the political nature of a critical ethics of care. Continue reading Critical Ethics of Care in Social Work