Author: Jeannet van de Kamp

Jeannet van de Kamp

Jeannet van de Kamp (1957) has master’s degrees in both Theology and Ethics of Care and is currently a PhD-candidate at the VU-University of Amsterdam. In her thesis she examines, from a care-ethical perspective, how citizen-patients are seen in the context of the upcoming experience economy. More specifically, she examines how ‘patient-experience-central’ market models deal with the concepts of vulnerability and suffering. She works as a freelance pastor.

Lotta Blokker’s ‘layered’ sculptures of human beings

Sculptress Lotta Blokker’s work It’s a Boy has featured on the Ethics of Care website for several years now. In July 2021, Blokker received the International Arkin Award, and a few months later she was chosen Artist of the Year (2022, the Netherlands). ((1)) These double honours are the occasion for Jeannet van de Kamp to look more closely at Lotta Blokker’s work, and also to discuss why this work is of interest to her, as contributing editor to the Ethics of Care website and as a researcher. Continue reading Lotta Blokker’s ‘layered’ sculptures of human beings

De-radicalization of inmates by artist and imam

Under Pressure is a short, realistic, not-idealized documentary about de-radicalization of ISIS fighters returning from Syria. In the juvenile prison of Wiesbaden (Germany) there are over 300 inmates. The majority of them are Muslims, whose parents and/or grandparents migrated to Germany. Continue reading De-radicalization of inmates by artist and imam

An unwelcome, disenchanted care ethics

Frans Vosman was PhD supervisor of website editor Jeannet van de Kamp. She reflects on some aspects of what Vosman has put on the agenda as a highly pressing issue: “I believe that it (care ethics) is losing the critical force that has been its distinctive attribute from the start.” (2020: 20) Continue reading An unwelcome, disenchanted care ethics

Humiliating benefit systems undermine self-respect

‘When you lose your self-respect, you’re done’
I, Daniel Blake is a British-French drama film about a 59-year-old skilled craftsman, widowed, living in Newcastle.
Daniel Blake (Dave Johns), is recovering from a severe heart attack. For the first time in his life, he needs help from the State. Continue reading Humiliating benefit systems undermine self-respect

Reflections on movie The big short

Wall Street collapses in The Big Short. The 2008 financial crisis left millions in the United States unemployed and without homes. It expanded into a worldwide financial and economic crisis. Not surprisingly in America, Hollywood revisits the economic ‘bubble’ created by mortgage dealers and reckless -too big to fail- banks. Continue reading Reflections on movie The big short