The wisdom of being ready (without necessarily giving up)

In the Netherlands a much debated issue is whether or not people who consider their life ‘to be completed’ should be able to get assistance in ending it. The concept ‘completed life’ is the central concept of a discourse that aims to make this a matter of Dutch legislation.

In the Netherlands a much debated issue is whether or not people who consider their life ‘to be completed’ should be able to get assistance in ending it. The concept ‘completed life’ is the central concept of a discourse that aims to make this  a matter of Dutch legislation. The issue that is at stake at the moment is different and much broader than the issue of euthanasia in the case of people suffering unbearably (one of the criteria in the Dutch law) and this will be explored here by several academics. In this  article dr. Ton Vink first summarizes his criticism on Els van Wijngaarden’s Ready to give up on life. He then adds a few remarks on Frits de Lange’s essay “When is a life completed?” and on the notions of ‘completed life’ and ‘narrative foreclosure’, concluding with some thoughts on ‘being ready’. You may read his article here

Ton Vink (1953) runs a philosophical practice . He is one of the main contributors, in writing and as counsellor, to the Dutch euthanasia debate. His next book on this subject Een goede dood. Euthanasie gewikt en gewogen (‘A good death. Deliberations on euthanasia’) is due to appear later this year (Klement, 2017). He is also editor of the journal Filosofie & Praktijk.

About the author: Webteam